Lighthouses of the Outer Banks

Outer Banks, North Carolina, March 2010

We got to experience 3 of the 5 famed lighthouses along North Carolina’s Outer Banks. We began at the most accessible southernmost point and worked our way north. From Kill Devil Hills (near Nags Head), we drove down to Hatteras Village and caught the ferry to Ocracoke Island. Ocracoke is only accessible by water & air and it is the epitome of a remote, simple seaside town. The Ocracoke Lighthouse boasts to be North Carolina’s oldest lighthouse in operation, (and the second oldest in the United States), after enjoying the island and the remote beaches for a few hours, we took the ferry back to the mainland.

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The Ocracoke Lighthouse is North Carolina’s oldest lighthouse in operation & the second oldest in the United States

From the mainland we made several pit stops along the way. In Buxton, NC, We stopped at the famed Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. There was a lovely poster here that distinguished all of the lighthouses along the Outer Banks.

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Cape Hatteras is one of the most recognized and most photographed

 

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Then we made it up the coast to Bodie Lighthouse. It was being renovated but we could not get very close so we got information in the visitors center.

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In March 2010, Bodie Lighthouse was being renovated.

Our stay in Kill Devil Hills did not permit a trip to the northernmost Currituck Lighthouse located in Corolla, NC

More scenes from North Carolina’s pristine National Seashore.

 

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4 thoughts on “Lighthouses of the Outer Banks

    1. Hello Deborah: Lighthouses can be enjoyed both up close and from a distance. Each one is different. Some are literally “a house” where a keeper and his family once lived. Some are converted into museums. Some allow navigation to the top. Some – generally fragile — allow only a view of the exterior. Some are private. Some are public. I certainly hope you get to explore — either from a distance or up close.

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