Waiting beside still water

Lessons learned from water fowl:

I happened upon three species of waterfowl while visiting Big Spring Park in Huntsville, Alabama. Each species – Geese, Egret – Ducks – were waiting beside still water. Neither species immediately dived in at the moment I was there. I watched them carefully and it was as if their were waiting, evaluating, and pondering their situation. Eventually they engaged with the water, but not without calculation.

The lesson I learned from waterfowl is that sometime we need to just sit and ponder. Sometimes it OK to observe and measure. We don’t have to move always: there is a time to sit, stand and just take it all in. At some point we have to get in the game, but standing on the sideline for a moment can be an enlightening learning experience.

“The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not want.
2 He makes me to lie down in green pastures;
He leads me beside the still waters.
3 He restores my soul;
He leads me in the paths of righteousness
For His name’s sake.”

Psalms 23: verse 1-3

Lessons learned from waterfowl
Egret Waiting beside still water
Lessons learned from Water Fowl
Geese Waiting beside still water

This post is a part of the Weekly Photo Challenge hosted by The Daily Post. This week’s theme is WAITING

#egret #geese #iHeartHsv #visitnorthal #ThisIsAlabama #

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5 thoughts on “Waiting beside still water

  1. This Old Spiritual came to mind as I read this blog post. The birds are waiting for the Lord to trouble the waters. Many years ago I had the opportunity to see and hear Sweet Honey in the Rock in person. I also met the original members years ago.

    Sweet Honey in The Rock – Wade in the Water

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    1. Hello Deborah: First, Thank you for visiting my blog, reading my post and leaving a comment. I sincerely value your input. Second, you are spot on — you figured out my play on words! Like you, I distinctly recall singing that hymn on the night of communion and baptism “Wade in the Water, Children” . Also, like you, I have a CD recording of Sweet Honey in the Rock and I have played it countless times; I even had my son and his friends listen to it and learn something about their culture.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Shibin Dinesh. Thank you for carving out time to visit my blog, read my post and comment. Based on my observation, nothing prevented the birds from entering; it was all about timing. The geese seemed to be “waiting” for another geese to make the first move. Once one went in, the others followed. The ducks seemed to be “waiting” for marching orders from what looked to be an adult flapping its wings; it was as they had to go in on cue. The egret appeared to be just basking in the moment [while participating in my photoshoot] and waiting for an appropriate moment enter in.

      Liked by 1 person

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